At 10:47 p.m. ET on July 28, Hillary Clinton made history when she accepted the Democratic party’s nomination to represent the party as it seeks to hold on to the White House in this fall’s general election. It is the first time in America’s history that a woman has earned the nomination for a major party.

She used her time on stage at the Democratic National Convention to lay out her plan for America and rally the millions of party members watching to unite under the same banner, sending a special shoutout to Bernie Sanders’ diehard supporters. “I want you to know. I heard you,” she said to Bernie Sanders’ supporters. “Your cause is our cause. Our country needs your ideas, energy and passion. That is the only way we can turn our progressive platform into real change for America. We wrote it together, now let’s go out and make it happen together.”

But how many times did she explicitly address people of color and the issues that uniquely impact them? Here is every instance we counted:

“Isn’t [Donald Trump] forgetting…mothers who lost children to violence and are building a movement to keep other kids safe?”

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“So, it’s true. I sweat the details of policy, whether we’re talking about the exact level of lead in the drinking water in Flint, Michigan, the number of mental health facilities in Iowa or the cost of your prescription drugs. Because it’s not just a detail if it’s your kid. If it’s your famly, it’s a big deal. And it should be a big deal to your president, too.”

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“My primary mission as president will be to create more opportunities and more good jobs with rising wages right here in the United States. From my first day in office, to my last, especially in places that for too long have been left out and left behind. From our inner cities to our small towns. From Indian country to coal country. From comunities ravaged by addiction to regions hollowed out by plant closures.”

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“I believe that when we have millions of hardworking immigrants contributing to our economy, it would be self defeating and inhumane to try to kick them out. Comprehensive immigration reform will grow our economy and keep families together, and it’s the right thing to do.”

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“We have to heal the divides in our country. Not just on guns. But on race, immigration and more. And that starts with listening. Listening to each other, trying as best we can to walk in each others shoes. So let’s put ourselves in the shoes of young Black and Latino men and women who face the effects of systemic racism and are made to feel like their lives are disposable. Let’s put ourselves in the shoes of police officers kissing their kids and spouses goodbye every day, heading off to do a dangerous and necessary job. We will reform our criminal justice system from end to end, and rebuild trust between law enforcement and the communities they serve. And we will defend, we will defend all our rights. Civil rights, human rights and voting rights. Women’s rights and workers’ rights. LGBT rights and the rights of people with disabilities.”

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“And we will stand up against mean and divisive rhetoric wherever it comes from. You know, for the past year many people made the mistake of laughing off Donald Trump’s comments, excusing him as an entertainer just putting on a show. They thought he couldn’t possibly mean all the horrible things he says, like when he called women pigs or said that an American judge couldn’t be fair because of his Mexican heritage. Or when he mocks and mimics a reporter with a disability, or insults prisoners of war like John McCain, a hero and a patriot who deserves our respect. Now at first, I admit, I couldn’t believe it either. It was just too hard to fathom that someone who wants to lead our nation could say those things, could be like that. But here’s the sad truth: There is no other Donald Trump. This is it. And in the end, it comes down to what Donald Trump doesn’t get: America is great because America is good. So enough with the bigotry and bombast.”

Did we miss anything? Refresh our memory in the comments.