Criminal Justice Reform

View of metal prison bars inside a prison

Advocates Convince Prosecutors to Visit Prisons Nationwide

Fair and Just Prosecution urges those at the “front door” of the justice system to witness the decay and overcrowding plaguing the nation’s correctional facilities.

Six men wearing different colored shirts sitting at a long wooden table outside, talking.

'College Behind Bars' Spotlights Fight For Education

The new PBS documentary follows 12 incarcerated people as they win national debates and work to earn college degrees.

View of a long hallway inside a prison. A person's arms can be seen hanging through prison bars.

New Report Exposes Dangers of Costly Criminal Justice Fees

These fines, which disproportionally impact communities of color, burden people with massive debt that affects their ability to successfully reenter society.

Ayanna Pressley. Black woman in a green, blue and tan striped dress as she stands behind a podium and gives a speech.

Ayanna Pressley Seeks to Remake Criminal Justice System

The Representative from Massachusetts introduces legislation that calls for a “decarceration-focused” system that is “smaller, safer, less punitive and more humane.”

Inside of a prison showing cells.

Formerly Incarcerated Leaders Host Historic Presidential Town Hall

The Marshall Project and Voters Organized to Educate host first-ever town hall led by formerly incarcerated activists.

Project Reset. Older Black man with bald hand standing in front of colorful artwork.

Arts-Based Diversion Program Expands to Combat Incarceration In New York City

Project Reset, a diversion program for teenagers accused of low-level offenses, will now be offered to adults in more parts of the city.

White writing on black chalkboard reads "vote"

ACLU Fights to Secure Voting Rights for Formerly Incarcerated in Florida

The civil rights group seeks to remove wealth-based hurdles to voting.

Black hands poke through orange sleeves, handcuffed around metal bars

The '94 Crime Bill 25 Years Later: It's Time for a Reckoning [Op-Ed]

Justice advocates say we must address the harm caused by the legislation and create a new vision for safety and freedom.

A group of Black women and men hold signs protesting the death of death of Walter Scott, who was killed by police in a shooting, outside City Hall in North Charleston, South Carolina, on April 8, 2015.

117 Civil Rights Advocacy Groups Commit to Justice Platform for 2020 Election

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, Civil Rights Corps and 115 other groups propose a unified plan for “transforming our criminal-legal system into one that respects the humanity, dignity and rights of all people.”

Ice cream. Vanilla and chocolate scoops on a cone.

Ben & Jerry's Remixes Ice Cream for Social Justice

The brand’s newest flavor, Justice ReMix’d, was created “to spotlight structural racism in a broken criminal legal system.”

Dark green statue of Justice magnified through black camera lens on red brick and brown stone walkway in front of brown building and white car

Landmark Case Set to Expose Racial Bias In Capital Punishment

“They feared that breaking the link between the death penalty and race would remove too many people from death row. They decided they were willing to accept racial bias to keep the death penalty.”

Large group of black-uniformed police officers gather on a sidewalk.

California Passes One of Nation's Strictest Deadly Force Guidelines

The legislation says law enforcement officers can only use deadly force “when necessary to defend against an immediate, deadly threat to themselves or others.”

Black man wearing brightly colored daishiki holds his arms out as he stands before a large group of police officers wearing riot gear.

How Can Rethinking Policing Reverse the Mass Incarceration Epidemic?

A new report from the Vera Institute of Justice breaks down how a single negative interaction with a police officer can alter a life forever—and how a shift in how the nation approaches justice can prevent the criminalization of people of color.

Meek Mill. Black man with short dark hair wearing gray suit jacket and white collared shirt.

'Free Meek' Docuseries Illustrates Plight of Black Men in Criminal Justice System

The five-part series explores racial injustice in the judicial system through the all too common case of rapper Meek Mill.

Christopher Remmey. Man in profile with mustache and beard sitting in low light looks past the camera.

WATCH: Doc Explores How Criminal Justice System Fails People With Mental Illnesses

“Forty hours of mental health training in a police academy that’s seven-and-a-half months long isn’t long enough.”

New York State Supreme Court building in Manhattan showing the words "The True Administration of Justice" on its facade.

Report Says State Supreme Court Justices Are Overwhelmingly White, Male

State courts wield a lot of power; the justices “hear 95 percent of all cases filed in the United States.”

Bryan Stevenson. Black man in gray jacket suit, black pants and tie, white shirt, standing on the steps of a courthouse.

EXCLUSIVE: Powerful Clip From HBO Doc on Bryan Stevenson's Liberatory Work

In “True Justice,” the Equal Justice Initiative founder connects the dots between enslavement and death sentences for Black people—and breaks down why he is committed to ending mass incarceration.

Black man in dark shit sits on couch with teen daughter as they work on a black laptop

Q&A: Meet the Formerly Incarcerated Dad Who Created an App to Connect Families

Colorlines talks to Antoine Patton about Photo Patch, the app he created with his daughter after teaching himself to code behind bars.

Black man wearing blue shirt and black glasses sits with his hands folded.

Second Chance Pell Experiment Expands Education Behind Bars

The program provides need-based grants to people incarcerated in state and federal prisons so that they can take college courses.

Illustration. Black woman with Afro black turtle neck and sign saying "we're bailing out Black mothers..."

Activists Organize to Bail Out Black Mamas for Mother's Day

In more than two dozen cities across the country, mothers who cannot afford bail are getting help to get home.