Kenrya Rankin

Deputy Editor
Picture of Kenrya Rankin

Kenrya Rankin is the deputy editor for Colorlines. An award-winning author and editorial consultant, her insight has been tapped by leading outlets, including The New York Times, The Huffington Post and ThinkProgress. She has published several books; her forthcoming project is titled "How We Fight White Supremacy" (Nation Books). As a journalist and editor, her work has appeared in more than a dozen national publications, including Fast Company, Reader’s Digest, Ebony and Redbook. She writes about everything from race to technology, and her work has been translated into 21 languages. She is also the founder and editorial director of parenting site BlackAndGreenMama.com and is a practicing doula. Kenrya earned her undergraduate degree in journalism from Howard University, and her master’s degree in publishing from New York University. She is a proud native of Cleveland, Ohio, and currently lives in the Washington, DC area with her brilliant daughter.

Follow Kenrya on Twitter: @kenrya

Brett Kavanaugh. White man's face takes up half the frame.

Time's Up on Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh

Christine Blasey Ford says the Trump nominee sexually assaulted her. The Time’s Up movement says the judge should not be appointed to the highest court in the land.

Watch as Jason Van Dyke Stands Trial for Killing Laquan McDonald

The White officer faces six counts of first-degree murder for shooting the retreating Black teen 16 times.

Protesters outside at night, one holds sign that reads, "Black trans lives matter."

Join #Time4BlackTransWomen For a Moment of Remembrance

Of the 20 known transgender women killed in the United States in 2018 so far, 14 of them were Black.

Harriet Tubman, Cynthia Erivo. Two Black women. One in black in white, wearing a dark-colored dress with a white collar. The other in color wearing a gauzy peach shirt over a multicolored dress

Cynthia Erivo to Play Harriet Tubman in New Biopic

Kasi Lemmons will direct the film, which follows the life and work of the legendary abolitionist.

White sign has a red adn blue American flag and the words "vote here" on it

People Of Color Are Still Being Locked Out of the Democratic Process

A new report from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights reinforces what many already know: the Supreme Court’s gutting of the Voting Rights Act made it easier for states to discriminate at the voting booth.

Cory Booker. Black man with bald head close to the camera.

Cory Booker Risks It All During Brett Kavanaugh SCOTUS Nom Hearing

The New Jersey senator released confidential files, saying his act of “civil disobedience” is necessary so that Americans can know Kavanaugh’s views on race and what is at stake during the hearing.

Ayanna Pressley. Black woman in green dress stands behind wooden podium with sign that says, "Ayanna Pressley Democrat for Congress."

Ayanna Pressley Earns Stunning Victory in Race to Rep Massachusetts

She will be the first woman of color to serve for her state in the U.S. House of Representatives.

Brett Kavanaugh. White man's face takes up half the frame.

WATCH: Brett Kavanaugh's Live Senate Hearing

NAACP President Derrick Johnson: “His views on voting rights, affirmative action, equal employment, fair housing and criminal justice could shut the courthouse door on justice for a generation.”

Black and white picture of dark cell with light coming through bars

READ: Notes From Inside the Prison Strike

Kevin Rashid Johnson writes from solitary confinement about the importance of fighting to reform the criminal justice system.

Trevor Noah, Hasan Minhaj. Two brown men sit in gray suits sit at large black-topped desk. One man points at the other, whose arms are above his head

Get Into Hasan Minhaj's Final 'The Daily Show' Appearance

The Desi comedian is moving on to star in his own show, Netflix’s “Patriot Act.”

Yo-Yo Ma. Man of Chinese descent smiles while wearing a white button-down shirt and playing a brown cello

WATCH: Yo-Yo Ma Revisits His Very First Cello Piece for Tiny Desk Concert

The Grammy Award-winning cellist turns to the music of Bach for his “ability to speak to our common humanity at a time when our civic conversation is so often focused on division.”

White sign with KKK hood with a no sign over it and brown text that reads, "No hoods in my woods."

Failed White Supremacist Rally Actually Unites Anti-Racist Activists

With just two dozen supporters on the ground in Washington, D.C.—and thousands of counter-protesters in the streets—the Unite the Right 2 rally was basically over before it began.

Split image. In one, brown man Spike Lee wears clear glasses frames and black and white clothing on cover of red-framed Time magazine. In second, a brown man wears a white hood that covers his face, brown leather jacket and holds an Afro pick.

READ: Spike Lee On Revisionist History and the Death of the Dog Whistle

The director talks about the relevance of his new film, “BlacKkKlansman,” whose release marks the one-year anniversary of the deadly Unite the Right march in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Mary G. Ross on a Google Doodle. Brown woman in a green dress, white pearls, with her face surrounded by a yellow and orange star with green trim. A gray satellite, starry space and Earth are behind her

Google Doodle Honors Mary G. Ross, First Native American Female Engineer

The pioneering aeronautical engineer helped design concepts for space travel to Venus and Mars.

Robert Taylor. Black man wearing light blue buttondown shirt stands in front of brown brick building

WATCH: Robert Taylor Battles Chemical Plant in 'Breathing While Black'

The 77-year-old man’s majority Black hometown—Reserve, Louisiana—carries a cancer risk more than 700 times the national average.

Wesley Bell. Black man smiles and points at his "I voted" sticker.

It's a Celebration As Voters Oust Prosecutor Who Freed Michael Brown's Killer

Ferguson City Council member Wesley Bell successfully challenged St. Louis County prosecuting attorney Bob McCulloch, as organizers and voters shout #ByeBob.

Illustrated image of two brown-skinned people lying in green foilage holding white masks

Nationwide Events Reimagine What Safety Means for Communities of Color

Night Out for Safety and Liberation organizers: “Focusing on policing as the primary path towards public safety causes harm to people of color. Safety comes from investment in public health solutions and the protection of all human rights. This is our opportunity to send this message loud and clear.”

Black people protest outside. Signs include "I am a man," "Blcack lives matter" and "The world is watching."

Police Less Likely to Arrest Killers With Black Victims

“There is a straight line between Black people being outraged loudly about police officers being able to shoot and kill people and being able to get away from it and Black people quietly wondering when that homicide in their neighborhood is going to be solved.”

Neon sign reads "bail bonds."

Bernie Sanders Introduces Bill to Dismantle Money Bail System

Bill supporter Color of Change: “When taxpayers foot the bill for needlessly locking up poor people before trial, the government is essentially subsidizing a racist, unnecessary and outright dangerous industry.”

Protesters outside. Brown woman in front wears red shirt, white and black sign behind her reads "No human is illegal. #DeportTrump."

Department of Justice Instructs Agency Press Officers to Call Immigrants 'Illegal Aliens'

From the directive: “The word ‘undocumented’ is not based in U.S. code and should not be used to describe someone’s illegal presence in the country.” But the referenced code does not include the word “illegal,” either.