L.A. Rebellion filmmaker Julie Dash’s “Daughters of the Dust” made her the first Black woman to direct a feature film with a theatrical release. Now, 25 years after its 1991 debut, a digitally restored version of the seminal film is set to hit theaters.

“Daughters of the Dust” follows the women of the Peazant family, rooted in the creole Gullah culture of South Carolina, as they prepare to migrate North in the early 1900s. The film explores themes of post-slavery cultural dislocation, African heritage adaptation and Black women’s identity with stunning depictions of traditional rituals and Lowcountry geography.

Many cultural critics noted the film’s creative influence on Beyoncé’s visual album “Lemonade.” Dash praised the artist’s “use of visual metaphors in creating, redefining and re-framing a Creole culture within this new world” in an interview with Vanity Fair. The filmmaker added that while she and Cohen Media Group already planned a re-release, ”everything sped up” after “Lemonade” brought increased attention to “Daughters of the Dust.”

Check out the trailer above. The restored film will be released in theaters on November 18.