Keynote Speaker Rev. Dr. William Barber II face emanates neon purple rays against a background of dark blue with dark teal concentric pentagonal shapes that subtly meet one another to create a cohesive pattern as they radiate out in to space. Race Forward Presents Facing Race: A National Conference.

While none of the Louisville police officers involved in Breonna Taylor’s March 13 killing have been charged for Taylor’s death, two reports made public yesterday (September 21) prove some movement is happening behind the scenes: Six LMPD officers are being investigated for the roles they played in the fatal shooting, and the Louisville police chief issued a departmentwide state of emergency “in anticipation of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron‘s announcement in the Breonna Taylor case.” 

The assumption, according to chief Robert J. Schroeder’s letter, is that Cameron will announce no criminal charges for the officers, which could further inflame civil unrest. CNN reported that some federal buildings will be closed this week, and the Associated Press tweeted today (September 22) that police have already started restricting access into downtown Louisville.

The African American Policy Forum shared Schroeder’s letter via Twitter

Yesterday (September 21), the Courier-Journal newspaper confirmed that half a dozen officers are being investigated by the Louisville Metro Police Department Professional Standards Unit. 

As Colorlines has previously reported, the city is on edge after weeks of protests and waiting six months for an official response. “No matter what the announcement is, it’s not going to be satisfactory to everybody,” Sam Aguiar, a Louisville attorney representing Taylor’s mother, Tamika Palmer, told USA Today. One big recent announcement was the $12 million settlement the family was awarded last week, which The Washington Post called  “among the largest payouts for a police killing in the country’s history.”

As for the six officers being investigated, the Courier-Journal reported that the unit didn’t confirm exactly what it was looking into, but that the result could end in “disciplinary action against the officers ranging from a written reprimand to termination.” The newspaper identified the officers as Myles Cosgrove and Jonathan Mattingly, who shot more than 20 bullets at Taylor’s apartment; Tony James, Michael Campbell and Michael Nobles, who were also on the scene; and Joshua Jaynes, who approved the search warrant for Taylor’s home, which ultimately that led to her violent death.