catherine lizette gonzalez

Editorial Assistant
Picture of catherine lizette gonzalez

catherine lizette gonzalez is the editorial assistant at Colorlines. Originally from Miami, Florida, she's worked as a legal assistant, domestic violence advocate, bookseller, educator, cashier and retail associate. In 2015, she was granted a media fellowship from Planned Parenthood Federation of America, where she expanded research and advocacy on sexual and reproductive health issues in immigrant and Latinx communities. She has also served as a youth educator for Sadie Nash Leadership Project, providing mentorship for young women and girls of color in Newark, New Jersey. Her work has appeared in Jai-Alai Magazine, the Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami, Bitch Media, NPR's Latino USA and She Shreds Magazine. She holds degrees in Latin American and Caribbean Studies from Florida State University and journalism from Columbia University. catherine currently resides in Queens, New York, and co-edits the online literary journal TAGVVERK.

Follow catherine on Twitter: @xatherin

arms in red sleeves insert ballot into voting machine

Florida Lawsuit Seeks Bilingual Ballots for Puerto Ricans Who Fled Hurricane Maria

Several advocacy organizations say elected officials in Florida are violating the voting rights of tens of thousands of Puerto Ricans who moved to the mainland after the devastating hurricane.

Several incarcerated firefighters in orange jumpsuits look on as a plane passes over a burned down field.

California Uses Prison Labor to Battle Dangerous Wildfires

Some 2,000 incarcerated firefighters from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation are earning just $2 a day to contain the largest wildfire ever recorded in the state’s history.

black barbed wire against an overcast sky

Detained Asylum-Seekers Say Government Violated Their Religious Freedom

Dozens of asylum-seekers held at a federal prison in Sheridan, Oregon, say authorities are denying them time and space to freely practice their faith.

yellow sign of amazon in black text

Activists Demand Amazon Stop Selling White Supremacist Merchandise

The actions come on the heels of a report released this month that says the Seattle-based company’s “inadequate and poorly enforced policies” have made the sale of these items on its website possible.

Two people outside standing against a brown steel wall overlooking the construction of a concrete wall

Book Q&A: How the Government Constructed An Anti-Immigrant Machine

In her new book, “We Built The Wall,” author Eileen Truax unravels how the United States’ economic and political interests stirred the violent conditions immigrants flee from and the policies that shut them out.

profile of a boy inside a vehicle cage

READ: Immigrant Children Sent to Juvenile Detention Centers, Psychiatric Facilities

In a lawsuit filed against the federal government, immigrant youth say they are fighting violent and abusive conditions in juvenile detention centers and psychiatric facilities.

Brown child sits on ground coloring while wearing dark jeans, tan shoes and shirt in various shades of blue.

Government to Test DNA of Nearly 3,000 Detained Migrant Children

The move comes on the heels of a federal court ruling that the Trump administration must end its practice of separating families and reunite children with their parents.

 A grid of summer books with titles like "sick," "if they come for us," "we built the wall," "assata taught me," and more

The Must-Read Race and Culture Books of the Summer

From memoirs to poetry to fiction, these titles will deepen your understanding of what’s going on, inspire activism and even entertain the kids.

Black woman at a rally holds a purple sign with yellow text that says America needs union jobs with an illustration of public sector workers

Alicia Garza On How SCOTUS' Labor Decision Hurts Women of Color

The National Domestic Workers Alliance organizer breaks down the Supreme Court’s ruling to eliminate fair share labor union dues via Janus v. AFSCME and how it will impact communities of color.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a Socialist Latina From the Bronx, Ousts 10-Term Representative

The Bronx-born and raised organizer is on track to represent her community in the House of Representatives—and become the youngest woman to ever serve in Congress.

How You Can Support Detained Immigrant Families

From volunteering to organizing to donating, here are actionable steps you can take to support immigrants and asylum-seekers being prosecuted and detained by the United States government.

A White man with white hair standing on a stage lit up by a black and white background behind him.

Reflections on Anthony Bourdain, Celebrated Chef and TV Host Who Opposed Racism and Xenophobia

People of color remember the award-winning chef, tv host and author who advocated for immigrants, supported the #MeToo movement, and fiercely opposed racism and colonialism.

A border patrol agent at the foreground, only shown are a gun hoisted at his pants and his right hand wearing a blue rubber glove. An immigrant man kneels down at an immigrant child. A border patrol car is to their right.

ICE To Transfer 1,600+ Detained Immigrants to Federal Prisons

Many of the immigrants are Central Americans fleeing from gang and sexual violence.

REPORT: Ben Carson's Plan to Raise Rent Hurts Poor Families of Color

Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson says he wants to raise rents for people living in poverty to push them into jobs. But a new report says his plan would force millions into homelessness.

Brown hands join together in a huddle outside. A fist bursts through the huddle and is raised into the air.

#FamiliesBelongTogether Campaign Demands Feds Stop Separating Parents, Children at Border

As part of the Families Belong Together campaign, protestors nationwide condemn the federal government’s practice of separating immigrant children from their parents under the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy on border crossings.

A person rests their head on their cross arms with San Juan and the water in the background.

Author Q&A: Understanding Puerto Rico's Debt Crisis Through Marx, Monsters and a Queer Decolonial Lens

Colorlines talks to Philadelphia poet laureate Raquel Salas Rivera about their new book, “lo terciario/the tertiary,” which revisits Karl Marx’s “Capital” to examine Puerto Rico’s debt crisis from a queer decolonial lens.

A black incarcerated person makes a phone call at a reintegration center as he faces a wall painted in monochrome blue and white with the American flag at the top

Why Reentry Is Incredibly Hard for Formerly Incarcerated Black and Latinx People

Colorlines talks to Bruce Western, author of  “Homeward: Life in the Year After Incarceration,” which follows the journeys of 100+ formerly incarcerated people as they navigate the challenges of racial, health and socioeconomic inequity.

'The Waiting Game' Explores the United States' Labyrinthine Asylum Process

A new multimedia “newsgame” from ProPublica and WNYC lets readers experience the arduous journey of applying for refugee status in the United States.

Black teenage students protesting in the streets one teen girl holds a sign that says "Schools are for learning not lockdowns"

Youth of Color Demand Racial Justice in Gun Reform During #NationalSchoolWalkout

On the 19th anniversary of the Columbine shooting, activists call for gun violence solutions that don’t further the criminalization of Black and Latinx youth.

Two police officers walking towards a public housing apartment complex

STUDY: Women of Color Living in Poverty Face Highest Risk of Eviction

A new report from Eviction Lab explores who is experiencing housing insecurity in the United States.