After facing months of criticism for sidelining women and girls of color in its exclusively male initiative My Brother’s Keeper, the White House released a report (PDF) Wednesday aimed at letting women know they’re important to racial justice, too. 

The report, released by the White House Council on Women and Girls, chaired by Valerie Jarrett, gathered information about how women and girls of color are faring in education, health, employment, domestic violence, and criminal justice. 

“Women and girls of color still face higher rates of poverty and receive lower wages for their work than their white peers, and they are more likely to become involved in the criminal justice system,” wrote Jarrett and White House Council on Women and Girls executive director Christina Tchen. “And when women are the primary or sole breadwinners for nearly half of all households of color, these disparities do not just affect them, but their families and communities as well.”

It’s a line that groups like the African American Policy Forum have been repeating for the last year in forums held around the country to highlight the experiences of girls and women of color. 

In addition to the report release, the Council is also putting together another committee called the Working Group on Challenges and Opportunities for Women and Girls of Color and will host a gathering January of next year to discuss increasing access to science, technology, engineering and math educational opportunities to girls of color.