As the Trump administration continues to publicly question the legitimacy of climate change, a new podcast is moving the conversation forward in decidedly productive, proactive ways.

Think 100%” debuts today (March 13) at 6 p.m. ET and will be broadcast weekly, featuring interviews with community leaders, politicians, artists and environmental activists. Launched by politically progressive nonprofit Hip Hop Caucus, it’s hosted by the organization’s president and CEO, Rev. Lennox Yearwood Jr., and Mustafa Santiago Ali, senior vice president of climate, environmental justice and community revitalization who formerly served as an administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency.

“’Think 100%’ comes at a crucial time for our communities now and for future generations, whose health and lives are jeopardized by the fossil fuel industry and elected leaders that value profits over people,” said Ali, in a statement released by Hip Hop Caucus. “Featuring stories from communities facing deadly impacts from pollution and climate change, and conversations with celebrities, artists, activists, youth leaders, Congressional Members, issue experts and more, the show will break down barriers between issues within the movement for justice and a sustainable planet for all.”

The premiere episode is titled “Inconvenient Truth: Environmental Justice in the 21st Century.” Per the Hip Hop Caucus:

Environmental justice isn’t just about making sure all communities have access to clean water and air. It’s about much more. It’s about making sure all of our communities have the rights, access, opportunities and resources to move from surviving to thriving. In the inaugural episode of “Think 100%,” we’ll be discussing the history of the movement, current attacks on safeguards that protect our communities and solutions like incorporating culture to move action and improve lives.

Guests on the first episode include Congressman Donald McEachin (D-Va.); Dr. Robert Bullard, a professor of urban planning and environmental policy at Texas Southern University who is considered the “father of environmental justice”; and Adrienne Hollis, director of federal policy at WE ACT for Environmental Justice.

Stream the show here.