Yessenia Funes

Climate Justice Reporter
Picture of Yessenia Funes

Yessenia Funes is the climate justice reporter for Colorlines. She was previously an editor at YES! Magazine, where she covered racial justice with a solutions lens. Her work has appeared in Grist, AlterNet, Public Radio International, and Truthout. Her writing touches on how race and the environment intersect, but she is passionate about any and all social justice issues. Readers can find her essay on El Salvador's environmental degradation in the 2017 Women of Color Anthology. A daughter to Salvadoran immigrants, Yessenia dreams of reporting on climate and environmental justice in Latin America.

Follow Yessenia on Twitter: @yessfun

Aqua Mechanical / Flickr

How Can We Prevent the Next Flint?

A new report from WIRED says we don't have the data necessary to avoid repeating history.

 The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this natural-color image of the storm at 12:48 p.m. Central Time (17:48 Universal Time) on June 20, 2017. (Caption by Adam Voiland)

What the Numbers Tell Us About Tropical Storm Cindy

It's hitting an area with a high concentration of Black people.

Joe Gratz / Flickr

UPDATE: Judge Likely to Make Decision on DAPL Operations in September

A U.S. District Court judge will hear arguments from both sides throughout the summer.

Image courtesy of Rainforest Action Network

REPORT: Bank Investments in Fossil Fuels Threaten Climate Change Goals

A new report finds that with $87 billion going toward the fossil fuel industry last year, banks are funding the possible failure of the Paris Agreement.

Buildings are seen near the ocean as reports indicate that Miami-Dade County will be one of the most at-risk places for rising water levels due to climate change on March 14, 2012, in North Miami, Florida.

This #WorldRefugeeDay, Let's Remember the Victims of Climate Change

By 2050, we could see up to 350 million climate refugees.

Kamil Kaczor / Flickr

READ: Will Officials Charged With Flint Water Crimes Really Do Time?

ProPublica takes a look at similar cases around the world and asks if the high-profile charges against government officials will result in prison time.

Fatima Avelica, 13, daughter of Romulo Avelica-Gonzalez, attends a rally for his release outside Immigration and Customs Enforcement offices March 13, 2017, in Los Angeles. Her father is mentioned in the Slate piece.

READ: 60 Days of Deportations and Detainments Under Trump

Tactics once reserved for violent criminals are now targeting undocumented youth and parents.

Jorge R. Gutierrez attends "The Book of Life" on October 13, 2014, in Miami, Florida. The director announced its sequel earlier this week, on June 14.

Director Announces He Is Releasing a Sequel to A Favorite Day of the Dead Animated Film

"Book of Life 2" is no longer a dream.

People stand together as they hold a vigil to support President Barack Obama's immigration executive action on April 18, 2016 in Miami, Florida. The order is now being rescinded under the Trump administration.

Trump Administration Keeps DACA in Place But Revokes DAPA

DAPA, the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents program, was created to keep families together but never took effect because it was tied up in litigation.

Natural gas is flared off at a plant outside of the town of Cuero, Texas, on March 26, 2015. The Bureau of Land Management has postponed regulations on these methane-emitting flares.

The Trump Administration Postpones Regulation on Methane and, Subsequently, Toxic Pollutants

It is the second attempt this week to repeal Obama-era rules on lowering methane emissions.

Demonstrators rally downtown before marching to Trump Tower while protesting the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline on February 4, 2017, in Chicago, Illinois.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Gains Ground in Dakota Access Court Case

The Army Corps of Engineers did not “adequately consider the impacts of an oil spill on fishing rights, hunting rights or environmental justice,” per the court order.

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette announced charges relation to the investigation into the water crisis on April 20, 2016, in Flint, Michigan. He is leading this investigation and announced new charges today.

Officials Face Involuntary Manslaughter Charges for Flint Water Crisis

“Everyone has to die of something,” said one of the accused.

Natural gas is flared off at a plant outside of the town of Cuero, Texas, on March 26, 2015.

EPA Wants to Extend a Methane Rule Pause From 90 Days to 2 Years

Environmental groups argue it will protect the oil and gas industries while harming residential communities.  

Colorlines screenshot of Bureau of Indian Affairs' website before and after, taken on June 14, 2017.

Climate Change Mentions Are Deleted From the Bureau of Indian Affairs' Website

This is the second website to remove all mentions of the manmade catastrophe.

Dozens of residents from Flint, Michigan, march to the officers of Gov. Rick Snyder and Attorney General Bill Schuette to deliver a message in a bottle in Lansing, Michigan, on June 13, 2017.

Flint Residents Deliver 1,000+ Empty Water Bottles to Elected Officials

Each contained a handwritten letter detailing how the water crisis has impacted a city resident.

Ancient granaries, part of the House on Fire ruins, are shown here in the South Fork of Mule Canyon in the Bears Ears National Monument on May 12, 2017, outside Blanding, Utah.

The Trump Administration Suggests Reducing the Size of Bears Ears National Monument

The site, home to ancient cliff dwellings and ancient rock art, currently covers 1.35 million acres.

Flags of the G7 group of nations, as well as the flag of the European Union, stand on a stage in the ancient amphitheater prior to the beginning of the G7 Taormina summit on the island of Sicily on May 26, 2017, in Taormina, Italy.

U.S. Does Not Sign G7 Document on Climate Change

This is the administration's latest move in staying out of the Paris Agreement.

 Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, 16, speaks at a rally for the federal climate lawsuit, of which is a plaintiff, on February 20, 2017, in Denver.

5 Things to Know About The Youth-Led Climate Lawsuit Against Trump

For one, the case didn't always involve the 45th president.

Colorlines screenshot of chart by Media Matters for America, taken on June 9, 2017.

TV News Coverage of Paris Agreement Lacks People of Color Representation

A new study shows less than 20 percent of guests were non-white.  

A child walks in his flooded neighborhood on May 4, 2017, in Arnold, Missouri. Towns along the Meramec River braced for the river to crest after days of rainfall in the region.

Will 100-Year Floods Become the Norm for Coastal Cities?

According to this study, yes—but only if "business-as-usual" carbon emissions continue.