Miriam Zoila Pérez

Gender Columnist
Picture of Miriam Zoila Pérez

Gender Writer
Miriam Zoila Pérez is a Cuban-American writer covering issues of race, health and gender. She is the founder of RadicalDoula.com, and was an Editor at Feministing.com for four years, during which time the site was awarded the Sidney J Hillman Prize for Blog Journalism. Her writing has appeared in The Nation, Alternet, The American Prospect, MORE Magazine, RH Reality Check and a number of anthologies, including "Yes Means Yes," "Click" and "Persistence." Pérez is the author of "The Radical Doula Guide: A Political Primer for Full-Spectrum Pregnancy and Childbirth Support."

Follow Pérez on Twitter: miriamzperez

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WATCH: Pakistani Student Asks President Obama How He's Supporting Non-Binary People

Non-binary Muslim student Maria Munir spoke to President Obama at an event in London over the weekend.

Half a Million People May Soon Lose Access to Planned Parenthood

Two dozen state legislatures have moved forward with efforts to defund Planned Parenthood. But one of the major tactics—blocking the health care centers from accepting Medicaid—is likely illegal.

#TransLiberationTuesday Shines Light on Trans People of Color

White trans artist Micah Bazant runs a weekly collaborative art project creating portraits that celebrate trans people of color in life, not just in memoriam.

Pushing Past Tokenism

La Sarmiento has been a leader of American LGBTQ and people-of-color Buddhist communities for close to a decade. I caught up with the trans, queer Filipino teacher before a silent retreat to discuss the dynamics of race and gender in a world that is typically White, cisgender and straight.

SCOTUS Unanimously Affirms 'One Person, One Vote' Principle

In an 8-0 decision, the Supreme Court affirmed that nonvoters should continue to be counted when dividing up congressional districts. This is a big voting rights win for people of color.

The FDA Just Removed An Important Barrier to Abortion Access

The FDA just updated the labeling for a drug used in medication abortions. It's a move that knocks down a major barrier to early access, particularly for people in Ohio, Texas and North Dakota.

Supreme Court Hears Another Religious Challenge to Contraceptive Coverage

Zubik v. Burwell continues a series of legal challenges by religious groups to the contraceptive coverage mandated by the Affordable Care Act.

New Documentary Reveals Just Hard It Can Be to Get an Abortion in the South

"TRAPPED" shows how anti-abortion TRAP laws are having real-life consequences for women of color and poor women in the South—from long waits to refusals due to short staffing. It also provides a glimpse into the lives of doctors who travel hundreds of miles each month trying to serve every woman in need—and often failing. 

Supreme Court Prevents Louisiana Abortion Clinic Law from Going Into Effect

The Justices announced late Friday that they were blocking the Louisiana law, which would close all but one clinic in the state by requiring hospital admitting privileges.

The Supreme Court Heard Arguments in the Biggest Abortion Case of Our Lifetime, and I Was in the Building

Oral arguments for Whole Woman's Heath v. Hellerstedt, the case centered on a Texas law that could make or break U.S. abortion access, were pretty muted. Outside, hundreds of activists, dominated by abortion rights supporters, chanted, sang and flashed their signs. 

What Scalia's Death Could Mean for the Big Abortion Rights Case

The shakeup in the Supreme Court could prevent a major setback to abortion rights nationally. But it also increases the likelihood that Texas women will remain without the majority of their state's clinics.

Brown Girls Do Ballet Wants to Make More Misty Copelands

PBS is premiering the Misty Copeland documentary, "A Ballerina's Tale," tonight (February 8). We talked to Brittani Marie, a former ballerina and the co-founder of Brown Girls Do Ballet, about the importance of Copeland's success, her own struggles with racism and body image and what it will take to bring more girls of color into the predominantly White ballet world.

ICYMI: Cruz Beats Trump, Clinton Squeaks by Sanders at Iowa Caucuses

Ted Cruz delivered a solid win over Donald Trump, with Marco Rubio coming in third. Hilary Clinton and Bernie Sanders basically tied, with Clinton eking out a win by just .3 percent.

Sterilization Abuse Documentary 'No Más Bebés' Premieres on PBS

PBS is now airing the story of sterilization abuse against Mexican-American women at a Los Angeles hospital in the 1970s.

HeartMob, Platform for Survivors of Online Harassment, Launches Today

The new site by the creators of Hollaback! supports people facing violent threats, racist messages and other forms of online harassment by allowing them to document the abuse and ask for help from other users.

Everything You Need to Know About the Biggest Abortion Case In Our Lifetime

On this 43rd anniversary of Roe v. Wade, you need to get familiar with another huge case the Supreme Court will hear in March: Whole Woman’s Health v. Cole.  It could reverse a controversial Texas law that has closed most of the state's abortion clinics under the guise of women's safety. Or it could mean that even fewer women in this country will have access to an affordable, safe and timely abortion. 

15 Remarkable Women of Color Who Rocked 2015

It's been a big year for these 15 changemakers from the worlds of political activism, art, literature, fitness and entrepreneurship.

3 Powerful Ways to Observe Transgender Day of Remembrance

Transgender Day of Remembrance is on Friday, November 20. Here, a few ways you can honor people who have lost their lives to anti-trans violence and celebrate the resilience of those who are living.

New Author Deepa Iyer Talks Post-9/11 Backlash and How ISIS' Paris Attack Will Impact Brown Folks Here

In her first book, civil rights activist and attorney Deepa Iyer chronicles the experiences of U.S. Arabs, Muslims, Sikhs and South Asians after 9/11 and weighs in on how the ISIS massacre in Paris will reverberate in this country.

Learning to Fight Oppression, One Joke at a Time

A new group in Washington, D.C., In Laughing Color, teaches queer and trans people of color to do improv, write jokes and command an audience. They're having their second "graduation" showcase this week.