Ayana Byrd

White marble building with columns and statue of someone holding an unfurled scroll, bright blue sky in the background

Judge Rules Indian Child Welfare Act Unconstitutional

When the law was passed in 1978, about a third of Native children were being forced into foster care and adoption.

Latinx woman receives an injection

Increased HPV Vaccine Age Limit Could Save Black, Latinx Lives

A disproportionate number of people of color develop HPV-related cancers.

The 1.35 million-acre Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah protects one of most significant cultural landscapes in the United States, with thousands of archaeological sites and important areas of spiritual significance.

Indigenous Activists Win Two Legal Battles To Protect Their Land

Federal courts halted moves by the Trump administration that would have contaminated water sources and destroyed Native cultural artifacts.

A plume of exhaust extends from a coal-fired power plant built in New Eagle, Pennsylvania.

Black and Latinx Families Live, Go to School and Grocery Shop Near Chemical Facilities

New research shows that the health risks—including cancer—multiply for people living at or near the poverty level.

Tobacco Farmers Fear That Flu Threat Will Hinder Seasonal Labor Migration

Migrant Farmers Could Be Hardest Hit By Hurricane Florence

This group of workers—many of whom are of undocumented status—have to choose between asking for help from FEMA and being deported by ICE.

Flood Damage After Hurricane Florence

5 Ways To Donate Money, Time and Other Aid to Communities Hit By Florence

These organizations are working to keep people in the Carolinas safe in the aftermath of the storm.

As Puerto Ricans Move to the Mainland, Rich White Americans Set Up Lives on the Island

Although post-Maria life has not returned to normal, PR is still attractive as a tax haven.

Carolinas Face Flooding After Hurricane Florence Lumbers Through States

READ: Black Homeowners in the Gullah-Geechee Islands Could Lose Land After Florence

A new Mother Jones article details how property laws could complicate post-storm recovery.

Black women of various shades laugh in the sunlight

Sexual Health Experts on Why 'Insecure' Needs to Practice Safer Sex

With STI rates dangerously high for Black people, do TV shows have a responsibility to wrap it up?

Leana Wen

Planned Parenthood's New President Has a Long History of Saving Black Mothers and Babies

Dr. Leana Wen is also experienced in standing up against the Trump administrations attacks on reproductive rights.

Protesters hold signs. Two blue and white signs say, "Keep abortion legal." One black and white sign says, "Abortion kills a person."

SURVEY: Black Women Overwhelmingly Support Roe v. Wade

They also lead the way in opposing the nomination of anti-abortion Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Hurricane Florence Likely To Strike East Coast With Damaging Effect

How Climate Change Could Make Hurricane Florence More Dangerous For Communities of Color

Global warming not only impacts the strength of the storm, but it can also impact the mental health of those affected by it. 

Native American Activists Celebrate Decision To Mark Columbus Day In LA County As Indigenous Peoples Day Starting 2019

READ: Bills Seek to Save the Lives Of Native Women

Savannas Act, the End Trafficking of Native Americans Act and the #NotInvisible campaign hope to strengthen the federal response for Indigenous women who are kidnapped and murdered.

Photo Illustration by Lars Baron/Getty

High Lead Levels Force Detroit to Shut Off Water Fountains At All Public Schools

The underfunded district faces millions in plumbing bills to reverse the problem. 

A man waves down to rescue crew as he tries to leave the area after he was inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas.

Race, Class Impact Houston Resisdents' Recovery From Hurricane Harvey

A year after the storm, many Black and Latinx Houstonians are still unable to safely live in their homes.

A child walks in his flooded neighborhood on May 4, 2017, in Arnold, Missouri. Towns along the Meramec River braced for the river to crest after days of rainfall in the region.

STUDY: After Natural Disasters, Whites Accumulate Wealth While People of Color Lose It

There are marked racial differences in the cost of disasters.

Black Man At A Doctor's Visit

STUDY: Increasing Number of Black Doctors Could Save Black Men's Lives

Black men have the lowest life expectancy in the United States. A new study examines why a doctors race can make all the difference.

Puerto Rico Faces Extensive Damage After Hurricane Maria

All of Puerto Rico's Residents Have Electricity Again, But Grid Is Still Fragile

Nearly one year after a full blackout, the electrical utilitys executive director acknowledges the situation remains a mess.

Pipelines in Williston, North Dakota, on June 15, 2011.

Racial Justice Groups Enjoy Tenuous Victory in Halting Atlantic Coast Pipeline Construction

The completed pipeline would expose Black communities along its path to dangerous levels of pollution, says the NAACP.

Work Begins In Flint To Replace Lead Water Pipes

Dangerously High Lead Levels Found In Suburban Chicago Homes

Researchers who helped in Flint, Michigan, are now intervening in Illinois.