Louisiana flooding

People receive free food from the American Red Cross on November 14, 2012 in the Queens borough of New York City.

The Red Cross Won't Reveal How Much of Harvey Donations Are Being Used for Harvey Aid

An executive talked around the question in an interview with NPR.

A flooded home is seen on August 15, 2016, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Record-breaking rains pelted Louisiana that weekend leaving the city with historic levels of flooding that caused 13 deaths and damaged thousands of homes.

Congress Investigates How FEMA Handled Louisiana's Historic Flooding Last Year

The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee issued a letter to the federal agency demanding documents.

Chris McGrath/Getty

Record Number of Floods Hit U.S. in 2016, Racking Up Global Natural Disaster Costs

The price marks a new high since records began in 1980.

A man carries personal items through a flooded street caused by remnants of Hurricane Matthew on October 11, 2016, in Fair Bluff, North Carolina. Storms like these will become more frequent, according to a new study.

STUDY: Climate Change to Increase Extreme Storms By Up to 400%

The Gulf Coast and the Southwest will be two of the areas hit hardest. 

A vehicle is partially submerged by floodwaters from the Lumber River on October 12, 2016, in Lumberton, North Carolina.

NOAA Declares Hurricane Matthew a 1-in-1,000 Year Flood Event

Even worse, the last time North Carolina saw a 500-year flood event was less than 20 years ago.

A man carries personal items through a flooded street on October 11, 2016, in Fair Bluff, North Carolina. Thousands of homes have been damaged in North Carolina as a result of Hurricane Matthew, and many are still under threat of flooding.

Hurricane Matthew Continues to Bring Disaster to North Carolina

The rain is over, but the threat of overflowing rivers and waters remains.

Wanda Sittig walks through the flood waters around her father's home as she helps salvage what she can on August 19, 2016, in St. Amant, Louisiana.

READ: Investigation Exposes How Red Cross Failed Louisianans During Flooding

The agency did not provide adequate food, water, medical attention or baby formula in various shelters.

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) arrives at a news briefing at the Capitol September 27, 2016, in Washington, DC. A day later, he'll defend necessary action from the Congress for the #FlintWaterCrisis.

Congress Approves Funding for Zika and Louisiana Floods

The bill only needs the president’s signature, but it’s still missing funding for the #FlintWaterCrisis.

Crystal Williams rallying days after Alton Sterling's murder in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, at a candlelight vigil held in honor of the LGBTQ victims and victims of gun violence in her community on July 10, 2016.

Life Inside a Baton Rouge Flood Victim Shelter

Crystal Williams is a chef, but since the storm, she has become an advocate for people at the River Center—even pretending to be an evacuee to get inside.

Severe storms that caused significant flooding is seen on August 14, 2016, in Port Vincent, Louisiana. Louisiana was overwhelmed with flood water causing at least 13 deaths and 150,000 properties damaged by the flood waters.

New Study Shows Link Between Louisiana Floods and Climate Change

Because of global warming, events like the one that devastated Baton Rouge are 40 percent more likely today than a century ago.

A Virgin Mary statue is seen in front of a flooded home on August 18, 2016, in St Amant, Louisiana.

Three Evacuations in 36 Hours, Fleeing From Disaster in Flood-Plagued Baton Rouge

With less than an hour’s notice, a mother of five fled her home, only to face a shelter or a costly hotel to house her family.

A sign is seen along a flooded road on August 15, 2016, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Record-breaking rains pelted Louisiana the weekend of August 12 leaving the city with historic levels of flooding that have caused at least 13 deaths and damaged homes.

Latest Numbers Show Louisiana Flooding Was Worse Than Initially Thought

Nearly 400,000 people in the Baton Rouge area were affected by the nonstop rainfall—and over one thousand are still in shelters.