Extreme Weather

 The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this natural-color image of the storm at 12:48 p.m. Central Time (17:48 Universal Time) on June 20, 2017. (Caption by Adam Voiland)

What the Numbers Tell Us About Tropical Storm Cindy

It’s hitting an area with a high concentration of Black people.

A child walks in his flooded neighborhood on May 4, 2017, in Arnold, Missouri. Towns along the Meramec River braced for the river to crest after days of rainfall in the region.

Will 100-Year Floods Become the Norm for Coastal Cities?

According to this study, yes—but only if “business-as-usual” carbon emissions continue.

 Flooding in Edgecombe County, which declared a state of emergency April 25 and whose population is more than half Black.

Severe Flooding in the South Kills 2, Puts North Carolina County in State of Emergency

When a community floods, its people of color are often hit the hardest.

Calved icebergs from the nearby Twin Glaciers are seen floating on the water on July 30, 2013, in Qaqortoq, Greenland. Greenland loses, on average, 375 gigatons of ice per year, according to a new report.

Two Recent Climate Change Studies Paint A Grim Picture

The manmade global catastrophe is already influencing extreme weather—and that includes in the Arctic, where sea ice is melting rapidly.

Colorlines screenshot of World Meteorological Organization report, taken on March 22, 2017.

REPORT: '2016 Was the Warmest Year on Record' and More

The World Meteorological Organization’s annual report had a clear—and sobering—message.  

Chris McGrath/Getty

Record Number of Floods Hit U.S. in 2016, Racking Up Global Natural Disaster Costs

The price marks a new high since records began in 1980.