The Center for Media Justice

Surveillance camera mounted to a wall, all in gray and purple tones

How the Government's Surveillance Practices Criminalize Communities of Color [OPINION]

We’re demanding more transparency and accountability around existing law enforcement surveillance practices, and urging our Congressional leaders of color to intervene on our behalf to prevent further exclusion, dehumanization and violence.

Someone holds sign on back of their head that reads, "WWW not $$$"

Broadcasting Hate: How Trump Used the FCC to Punish the Poor [OP-ED]

Erin Shields of Center for Media Justice and Lucia Martinez of Free Press break down what they call the Trump administration’s “war on the poor.”

A collage of news clippings symbolizes urban unrest in the late '60s

50 Years After the Landmark Kerner Report Called Out Media Racism, the Power Structure Persists [OPINION]

Created to study the urban rebellions of 1967, the Kerner Commission revealed in 1968 how racist media played a role. As the Kerner report turns 50, Free Press’ Joseph Torres argues that large media companies continue to uphold White supremacy. 

What Does the FBI's New 'Black Identity Extremist' Label Really Mean to Black Organizing?

“Acting with great principle in this time is not just a matter of moral high ground but also a matter of personal safety,” says surveillance reform expert Malkia Cyril. “What we need to not do is be paranoid. What overcomes paranoia is principles.”

iPhones with Facebook, Twitter and Instagram icons on them

REPORT: Social Media Giants Helped Police Track Ferguson, Baltimore Protests

The ACLU says that Facebook, Instagram and Twitter all provided user data to Geofeedia, a company whose social media montoring product was marketed to and used by law enforcement agencies to follow protestors.

FCC logo in white against gray-navy background, yellow and navy Baltimore Police Department logo against white background

Advocacy Orgs File Complaint Over Baltimore PD's Phone-Tracking Technology

The complaint says the department disproportionately uses “stingray” technology, which allows police to track the location of cell phones.