Voices

Someone holds sign on back of their head that reads, "WWW not $$$"

Broadcasting Hate: How Trump Used the FCC to Punish the Poor [OPINION]

Erin Shields of Center for Media Justice and Lucia Martinez of Free Press break down what they call the Trump administration’s “war on the poor.”

A Black man wearing a black sweatshirt and red cap over dredlocks and playing a trumpet passes a colorful mural of the Memphis sanitation worker's "I Am a Man" strike

It's Our Job to Finish Dr. Martin Luther King's Economic Justice Work [Opinion]

On the 50th anniversary of the assassination of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Former Ohio State Senator Nina Turner reflects on the critical income inequality work he supported and our urgent need to finish it. 

Michael Bennett. Black man in brown and tan checked blazer.

I Wrote A Book With Michael Bennett. Here's Why I Stand With Him Now. [Opinion]

Dave Zirin, the co-author of “Things That Make White People Uncomfortable,” on why there’s nothing at all uncomfortable about standing by the activist athlete.

A black and white newsclipping of a Black woman wearing a lacy collar with her hair pulled back

No, I Won't Get Your Coffee. Now Can You Hire More Women of Color? [OPINION]

Journalist and educator Jessica Brown on why newsroom diversity efforts fail so frequently.

Crowd of protesters hold red and white signs that read, "It's about freedom" and "Unrig the system."

Unions Helped Build the Black Middle Class. The Wealthy's Political Lackeys Are Out to Gut It. [OPINION]

As the Supreme Court considers the future of unions in Janus v. AFSCME Council 31, Color of Change’s Rashad Robinson examines how racism conspires to keep workers of color from uniting to reach their full potential.

A collage of news clippings symbolizes urban unrest in the late '60s

As the Kerner Report Turns 50, I Actually Have Some Good News About the Media [OPINION]

Rinku Sen: “I’ve read thousands of justifiable words about how little has changed and has even gotten worse for people of color in the media. But there’s no question that the last 50 years would have been immeasurably worse without the actions of reporters and news consumers of color.”

Orange flames on a black background

The Final Fire: Reflections on the 50th Anniversary of the Kerner Commission [OPINION]

The Kerner Commission concluded that unrest in cities across the country was the result of unaddressed racial and economic injustice. What has—and hasn’t—changed in the last 50 years?

A collage of news clippings symbolizes urban unrest in the late '60s

The Kerner Report Called for More Black Journalists. Major Newsrooms Remain a 'White Man's World' [OPINION]

When the Kerner Commission indicted U.S. journalism for its misrepresentation of Black communities in 1968, the report called on media companies to hire, train and promote Black journalists. FAIR program director Janine Jackson argues that corporate media is still failing to confront its own racism.

A collage of news clippings symbolizes urban unrest in the late '60s

50 Years After the Landmark Kerner Report Called Out Media Racism, the Power Structure Persists [OPINION]

Created to study the urban rebellions of 1967, the Kerner Commission revealed in 1968 how racist media played a role. As the Kerner report turns 50, Free Press’ Joseph Torres argues that large media companies continue to uphold White supremacy. 

A closeup of a muscular Black man in a gray costume with sharp metal nails

Representation Matters: Long Before the Movie, Black Panther Validated My Black Self

“Representation matters” has become a catchphrase. Because it’s true. Here, one lifelong Black Panther fan explains why he’s so passionate about a superhero movie.

A young Brown woman holds up a sign that says "I am a Dreamer. You can't deport ideals" at a New York City protest

How the GOP is Using the Budget Process to Destroy Immigration as We Know It [OPINION]

Rinku Sen argues that the Congressional budget process is just a tool for the GOP to reach its ultimate goal—a radical reordering of 50 years of immigration policy that is transparent in its hostility toward immigrants of color.

An elderly Black man in a suit holds up a fist during a jazz performance

For a Conscious Black Child of the '80s, Hugh Masekela Brought Lightness to the Heavy Anti-Apartheid Movement

Being a kid during the anti-apartheid movement meant learning, in real time, that the oppression of Black people was global. Akiba Solomon gives thanks for the joy and lightness that the father of South African jazz brought to an intense international struggle. 

Purple solar panels on a huge white board

Energy Democracy: People Power for a Cleaner Planet [OPINION]

By putting power—literally—in the hands of the people, “energy democracy” could have potentially game-changing benefits for low-income people and communities of color. 

U.S. Senate candidate Doug Jones, wearing a suit, sits at a table with a Black man in a fisherman's hat, a Black woman in a black wool hat and a Black man wearing a black and black khaki striped shirt

Black Alabamans Appreciate Your Thanks. Now Give Us the Power.

Doug Jones won the special senate election in Alabama because Black folks used our own homegrown tools that we have been building and refining for many years. It’s past time to substantially invest in Black political organizing infrastructure in the South.

Illustration of Brown man in green sweater and black shirt and tan pants on grey background

Hari Kondabolu’s New Doc Shows How the Racist Apu Character on 'The Simpsons' Still Haunts Desi America

Through his own experiences and those of actors such as Aziz Ansari and Kal Penn, the comedian explores the trouble with the animated Indian convenience store clerk in an hourlong documentary set to air on truTV. 

A Black man in a blue uniform shirt smiles

The Prison Reform Movement Must Center The Voices of Incarcerated People [OPINION]

Emile DeWeaver is the co-founder of Prison Renaissance and has been incarcerated for 20 years. He discusses the influence of activist and author James Forman Jr. on his work, and the importance of centering the voices of incarcerated people in the prison reform movement.

What I Learned From #MeToo: Stop the Instant, Harsh Critiquing [OPINION]

RaceBaitr editor Arielle Iniko Newton admits she was quick to dismiss #MeToo. Here, she reflects on how harsh, premature critiques of the online, decentralized campaigns so many of us use can hinder our growth.

Yellow and black police tape in front of grey cement road with yellow and white lines in front of brown buildings with navy text

Gun Control Advocates Cannot Win Without Fighting Their Own Racism [OPINION]

The National Rifle Association uses racism to make people of color the enemy. But the logic that gun control advocates lean on after mass killings—like Sunday’s massacre in Las Vegas—relies on racist assumptions of a different kind. Here’s what they need to challenge to secure meaningful, equitable gun control legislation.

A Black man with a mustache wearing a brown shirt in front of a photo backdrop with trees and a waterfall

UPDATE: Political Prisoner Herman Bell Has Moved Facilities, Returned to General Population and is No Longer Facing Assault Charges

On September 5, former Black Panther Herman Bell was assaulted by guards at Great Meadows Correctional Facility. He spent weeks in isolation, received inadequate medical care and was denied a scheduled family visit. Here, his daughter-in-law reflects on how vital these all-too-rare chances to connect truly are.

In an airport, a red sign with white writing that says "Security Checkpoint"

Airport Racism Has Stolen My Joy of Flying

For Nikko Viquiera, air travel once symbolized freedom. But racist and anti-immigrant sentiment has turned flying into a nightmare for this recent immigrant from The Philippines.