Voices

Dozens of people hold and rally around a massive red sheet with "We believe all survivors" printed on it in navy blue.

This Is a Defining Moment for Women of Color Who Survived Sexual Violence [OP-ED]

“We saw an educated White woman with financial, legal and familial support testify about being sexually assaulted, and then face the emotionally exhausting experience of being cross-examined for hours and disbelieved by many Senators. We got the message: If they won’t listen to her, it will be even worse for us.”

A drawing of a black and white body wrapped in red ribbon that says "This is not yours"

I'm a Survivor Who Isn't Brave Like Anita and Christine. And That's OK

As she watches the fate of Christine Blasey Ford and new Kavanaugh accuser Deborah Ramirez, labor organizer Camille rivera reflects on why coming forward should always be the survivor’s choice.

Awkwafina. Asian-American woman with blond hair, wearing red and white top

Performing Blackness Won't Fill Our Asian-American Culture Deficit [OP-ED]

The fight for media representation has become one of the most prominent rallying cries among Asian Americans. But if we wish to subvert White hegemony, we must step away from the imitation of Whiteness’ exploitation of Blackness.

Large gold fountain in front of white, tan and gold house with massive white columns. Two women walk toward each other, arms above their heads

How This Crazy Rich Asian Fights Wealth Inequality and the Model Minority Myth [OP-ED]

Resource Generation’s Iimay Ho: “I’ve been looking forward to the release of ‘Crazy Rich Asians,’ but I’m not surprised that Warner Bros. took a bet on a movie where rich Asians show they can act like rich White people and reinforce the model minority myth.”

It's Time for Atlanta to Stop Colluding With ICE [OP-ED]

A new report from Project South and Georgia Detention Watch details the “inhumane” conditions inside the Atlanta City Detention Center where Immigration and Customs Enforcement detains immigrants.

Brown young woman with two French braids wearing a maroon shirt holds a neon green sign that reads "Free the children."

Why Trump's Move to 'Address' Border Separations Isn't a Victory [OPINION]

“For Trump to claim he is saddened by the family separation policy he created and to offer family detention as a benevolent act reeks of cynicism and hypocrisy.”

A Black man with long locs wearing a grey and black sweater smiles.

How I Survived 'Ex-Gay' Conversion Therapy [OPINION]

At age 17, Darren Calhoun was manipulated into conversion therapy by a pastor. Here, he reflects on his path from confused teen to advocate for the hundreds of thousands of LGBTQ people in the United States who are subjected to the same treatment.

Black woman with dredlocks in front of a Starbucks.

On Starbucks: Looking Beyond Implicit Bias Training to Systemic Solutions [OPINION]

Race Forward president Glenn Harris on why Starbucks’ mandatory anti-bias training is a good start, but far from a cure for what ails America.

A sign for Sinclair Broadcast Group appears at the forefront of a parking lot, a tree without leaves, and the building for the corporation in the far background with an overcast sky.

Media Merger Madness: Why the Marriage of Sinclair and Tribune Is a Credible Threat to Our Democracy [OPINION]

Considering conservative-leaning Sinclair’s history of acquiring local stations and centralizing news operations, the new broadcast behemoth would be able to determine which community efforts receive media attention, harden political viewpoints and define what constitutes a terrorist threat.

"Facebook" written in white letters on a glass window, a blue light shines on the window

Facebook Must Protect Its Black Users [OPINION]

“The platform is a safe space for White supremacists to spew anti-Black vitriol, organize Klan rallies, and encourage physical violence against Black people without reprimand from Facebook.”

A Native American woman wearing a floral shirt and black sweater smiles

3 Things to Keep Me From Rolling My Eyes at Your White Privilege

Gabriella Cazares-Kelly, a community organizer from the Tohono O’odham Nation, presents three best practices for White allies trying to meaningfully engage with people from underrepresented groups at meetings, protests and events.

Someone holds sign on back of their head that reads, "WWW not $$$"

Broadcasting Hate: How Trump Used the FCC to Punish the Poor [OPINION]

Erin Shields of Center for Media Justice and Lucia Martinez of Free Press break down what they call the Trump administration’s “war on the poor.”

A Black man wearing a black sweatshirt and red cap over dredlocks and playing a trumpet passes a colorful mural of the Memphis sanitation worker's "I Am a Man" strike

It's Our Job to Finish Dr. Martin Luther King's Economic Justice Work [Opinion]

On the 50th anniversary of the assassination of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Former Ohio State Senator Nina Turner reflects on the critical income inequality work he supported and our urgent need to finish it. 

Michael Bennett. Black man in brown and tan checked blazer.

I Wrote A Book With Michael Bennett. Here's Why I Stand With Him Now. [Opinion]

Dave Zirin, the co-author of “Things That Make White People Uncomfortable,” on why there’s nothing at all uncomfortable about standing by the activist athlete.

A black and white newsclipping of a Black woman wearing a lacy collar with her hair pulled back

No, I Won't Get Your Coffee. Now Can You Hire More Women of Color? [OPINION]

Journalist and educator Jessica Brown on why newsroom diversity efforts fail so frequently.

Crowd of protesters hold red and white signs that read, "It's about freedom" and "Unrig the system."

Unions Helped Build the Black Middle Class. The Wealthy's Political Lackeys Are Out to Gut It. [OPINION]

As the Supreme Court considers the future of unions in Janus v. AFSCME Council 31, Color of Change’s Rashad Robinson examines how racism conspires to keep workers of color from uniting to reach their full potential.

A collage of news clippings symbolizes urban unrest in the late '60s

As the Kerner Report Turns 50, I Actually Have Some Good News About the Media [OPINION]

Rinku Sen: “I’ve read thousands of justifiable words about how little has changed and has even gotten worse for people of color in the media. But there’s no question that the last 50 years would have been immeasurably worse without the actions of reporters and news consumers of color.”

Orange flames on a black background

The Final Fire: Reflections on the 50th Anniversary of the Kerner Commission [OPINION]

The Kerner Commission concluded that unrest in cities across the country was the result of unaddressed racial and economic injustice. What has—and hasn’t—changed in the last 50 years?

A collage of news clippings symbolizes urban unrest in the late '60s

The Kerner Report Called for More Black Journalists. Major Newsrooms Remain a 'White Man's World' [OPINION]

When the Kerner Commission indicted U.S. journalism for its misrepresentation of Black communities in 1968, the report called on media companies to hire, train and promote Black journalists. FAIR program director Janine Jackson argues that corporate media is still failing to confront its own racism.

A collage of news clippings symbolizes urban unrest in the late '60s

50 Years After the Landmark Kerner Report Called Out Media Racism, the Power Structure Persists [OPINION]

Created to study the urban rebellions of 1967, the Kerner Commission revealed in 1968 how racist media played a role. As the Kerner report turns 50, Free Press’ Joseph Torres argues that large media companies continue to uphold White supremacy.