Dispatches

A black man wearing a black vest holds up a sign that says "Net neutrality affects us all."

Malkia Cyril Explains Exactly Why the Loss of Net Neutrality Matters—and What's Next

The veteran media justice organizer, who vows to see the FCC in court, forecasts a future of ”pay-for-play” internet, higher prices and de facto censorship. 

Not Your Grandmother's Women's Convention

Nine months after the Women’s March, a surprisingly diverse crowd of 5,000 met in Detroit for the inaugural Women’s Convention. Their mission? To transform the energy of the march into strategy, bridge gaps and build power. 

I Almost Died in Charlottesville

Journalist and researcher Spencer Sunshine started observing racist hate events in the late 1980s. Last Saturday’s “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville almost killed him. Here, an unvarnished dispatch from the picturesque Virginia town—from the violent lead-up in Emancipation Park to the deadly aftermath downtown.

Man in white feather headdress wearing a pink and gray gas mask and denim jacket beats on a drum

15 Beautiful Moments From Native Nations Rise [PHOTOS]

Thousands of Indigenous people and allies descended on Washington, D.C., last week for the three-day Native Nations Rise convening and mass march. Photographer and digital storyteller Ayşe Gürsöz captured the whole thing.  

From NOLA to AfricaTown, a Black Bike Enthusiast's Dream Trek

To celebrate the self-determination of the Black South, women-owned adventure company Black Freedom Outfitters led a three-day journey from New Orleans to AfricaTown, Alabama. Ride along.

Dispatch from Oregon: Armed White Occupiers Are Enjoying Warm Food, Wi-Fi—and No Violence From Feds

It’s been 19 days since a predominantly White group of men bearing arms group took over Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. They’re appointing themselves judges, threatening locals and stealing Native artifacts. Inside a netherworld where law enforcement lets right-wing paramilitaries run things. 

Dispatch From COP 21: Climate Change is the New Color Line

As the 2015 Paris Climate Conference comes to an end, Roberto Lovato reflects on race, global geography and the urgent need for people of color to tell their climate-change stories.

Series Finale—Race Trips: Confederate Lies and Apple Pie

In the final entry of this Colorlines series, journalists Brian and Erin Hollaway Palmer, an interracial couple, complete their trip through the Deep South where they’ve confronted the big lie of Confederate history, the truth about some of their ancestors, and the profound weirdness of a polite society plagued by racism. 

Part 6—Race Trips: Confederate Lies and Apple Pie

In Part 6 of this Colorlines series, journalists Brian and Erin Hollaway Palmer, an interracial couple, continue their trip through the Deep South where they’re confronting the big lie of Confederate history, the truth about their ancestors, and the profound weirdness of a polite society plagued by racism. 

Part 5—Race Trips: Confederate Lies and Apple Pie

In Part 5 of this Colorlines series, journalists Brian and Erin Hollaway Palmer, an interracial couple, continue their trip through the Deep South where they’re confronting sugar-coated Confederate history, the stories of their ancestors, and the profound weirdness of a polite society plagued by racism. 

Part 4—Race Trips: Confederate Lies and Apple Pie

In Part 4 of this Colorlines series, journalists Brian and Erin Hollaway Palmer, an interracial couple, continue their trip through the Deep South where they’re confronting sugar-coated Confederate history, their family histories, and the profound weirdness of a polite society plagued by racism. 

Part 3—Race Trips: Confederate Lies and Apple Pie

In Part 3 of this Colorlines series, journalists Brian and Erin Hollaway Palmer, an interracial couple, continue their trip through the Deep South where they’re confronting the big lie of Confederate history, the truth about their ancestors, and the profound weirdness of a polite society plagued by racism. 

Race Trips: Confederate Lies and Apple Pie

In a new Colorlines series, journalists Brian and Erin Hollaway Palmer, an interracial couple, are traveling the Deep South to confront the big lie of Confederate history, the truth about their ancestors, and the profound weirdness of a polite society plagued by racism. 

Dispatch from Highland Park: Gentrification, Displacement and the Disappearance of Latino Businesses

Latino-owned stores seem to be disappearing in L.A.’s Highland Park at an alarming rate. Aura Bogado reflects on race, ownership, class and change in this quickly gentrifying neighborhood.

Colorlines Needs You!

As we approach the new year, we’d like to thank you for reading, tweeting, commenting and generally engaging with Colorlines this year. Please help us keep going.

Colorlines' Greatest Hits of 2014

In the run-up to 2015, some of our writers and editors reflected on our favorite Colorlines stories to write and read in 2014.

The Untold Story of Black Fatherhood

The constant refrain about a crisis of black fatherhood obscures out a far more complex reality in black families.

Dispatch from Ferguson: Convenience Store Owners Talk Race

In Ferguson for the National Weekend of Resistance, activist and writer Deepa Iyer talked to area South Asian and Arab-American shopkeepers about race, community and police.

Get on the Bus: Inside the Black Life Matters 'Freedom Ride' to Ferguson

Over Labor Day weekend, Akiba Solomon took a 21-hour bus ride to Michael Brown’s town with a group of black activists traveling under the name Black Life Matters. Here’s some of what happened during the jam-packed days.

Dispatch From Chicago: War Abroad Touches Palestinian-American Youth

What does it mean to be young and Palestinian and American in this moment in history?