Facing defamation lawsuits from several police officers she charged in connection with Freddie Gray’s death, Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby has remained virtually silent in the two months since she announced that she was dropping the remaining charges. But she broke her silence about the galvanizing case in a new feature from The New York Times Magazine.

Writer and Baltimore resident Wil S. Hylton features candid interviews with Mosby, her city council member husband Nick and an assortment of anonymous police officers, reporters and others that trace the confusing and oftentimes conflicting narratives of Mosby’s youth, her investigative and prosecutorial methods, her husband’s doomed mayoral run and her life after the trials.

The whole article is a must-read, but a few passages stand out. In one, Mosby—whose family has long-standing connections to the police—describes her view of contemporary racial justice protests: 

I asked Mosby if, during [her college] years, she also began to see another side of the police; if like so many Black Americans, she found herself stopped and questioned without cause. “I can’t tell you how many times that’s happened to me and my husband,” she said. “But at the end of the day, what are we doing about it? Back in the day, they strategized, they organized. It wasn’t just marching and protesting. And it’s so frustrating to me. Do you know how much of a difference you can make by being at the table? For example, the whole Black Lives Matter—like, start enrolling in these police departments! I’m trying to reform the system from within. [95] percent of the elected prosecutors in this country are white. [79] percent are White men. As a woman of color, I represent 1 percent of all elected prosecutors in the country.

In another, she discusses the tension she still feels with Nick, whose mayoral run coincided with the trial and led to accusations of greater political ambition motivating her prosecution:

Marilyn told me that she and Nick had never talked openly about the distance [between them], but as dinner wound down in my kitchen, it came up.

We were talking about the criticism of his influence, and she said, “I had to establish my own sort of leadership, because I was being accused of him running my office.”

Nick turned to Marilyn. “Our strength has always been working together,” he said.

“I have to take into consideration the political ramifications,” she said. “You may be asking what took place at work, but because I’m so much on guard, I don’t want to talk about that. But then that creates this…. “

“Chasm,”Nick said.

“A chasm between us,” she said.

“There’s always going to be some level of disconnect there,” Nick said. “I don’t see it ever returning back to the level where it was.”

Marilyn looked surprised. “Like you mean the damage has been done?” she asked.

“It’s just like, that’s what the relationship is now,” he said.

Read the provocative new piece here, and let us know what you think in the comments.