By Secure Communities standards, its precursor, the federal immigration-local police partnership program 287(g), seems anachronistic. Older, more expensive, less widely used, 287(g) authorized local police to act as if they were immigration agents. Today, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors will decide the program’s fate in the county.

As the federal government has turned its attention to Secure Communities, Los Angeles has lost much of the financial incentive to track the immigration statuses of people cycling through the criminal justice system, KPCC reports. In recent years, immigrant rights activists have pushed back on both programs, winning the TRUST Act, a state law in California that limits the detention requests the federal government may make of local law enforcement agencies. 

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, for its part, has recommended that the county hold on to its 287(g) contract, KPCC reports.