Juba Kalamka

Jeff Buckley Around the World

The posthumous DVD/CD set captures the best of the artist's live performances

Darius Rucker Crosses Country Music’s Color Line

The former star of Hootie & the Blowfish becomes the first Black man to win the Country Music Association award for best new artist.

Race Records

Reviews of Cowboy Troy's album Loco Motive and Toby Keith's White Trash With Money,

Ruth Brown And Q-Tip Are Back

A survey of soul history, and a glimpse at the future of hip-hop.

The Joy of Patti Austin

After more than 50 years of making music, the R&B singer still sounds excited about the possibilities.

Music: Darius Rucker

Learn to Live reflects on reaching middle-age with a raw and honest vulnerability.

Music: Asobi Seksu

The duo's new album Hush is sprawling and ethereal in one moment and intensely focused in others.

Music: TV on the Radio

TV on the Radio's third album, Dear Science, is flecked with Obama-esque hope.

Music: Girl In A Coma

The new album from the San Antonio, Texas–based trio is well worth the wait.

A Band Called Pain

The Black heavy metal quartet has produced an album that belies simple racialized aesthetics.

Rapping Whiteness

The hip-hop group AntiRacist 15 uses community organizing as a model for music that inspires.

Book Reviews

Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South and Speaking From the Body: Latinas on Health and Culture

Race Records

Reviews of new releases from Public Enemy, Shock G and Teena Marie.

Race Records

Queer Gothic Soul on Misogyny, Sexism and the Middle East.

Race Records

Zap Mama
Ancestry in Progress

The highly anticipated follow-up to 2000’s A Ma Zone finds frontwoman Marie Daulne using a pastiche of sound effects as metaphor for personal and familial histories. Ancestry’s spread of Daulne’s trademark chirping, raspy vocal gymnastics over chopped-up vocal samples and snippets of movie dialogue combined with inspired guest emceeing by Bahamadia (“Show Me The Way”) and Talib Kweli (“Yelling Away”) was well worth the wait.

How Can I Be Down? A bisexual black man’s take on “the down low.”

The notion that black men on the “DL” are categorically bi is a gross oversimplification of the issue, and it shows little understanding for the way black men navigate their sexuality and identity.