Child migrants sleep in the Brownsville, Texas, processing facility. Photo: Eric Gay-Pool/Getty Images
Tue, Jul 15, 2014 5:02 PM EDT

The U.S. is making good on promises to expedite the processing and removal of child migrants arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border. On Monday the first planeload of 40 women and children departed from New Mexico and landed in Honduras, where the migrants were greeted by much fanfare, including Honduras' first lady Ana Garcia de Hernandez.

It's not softening the removal, though. The Los Angeles Times' Cindy Carcamo reports:

Critics said Honduran government inaction was largely responsible and that the welcome in San Pedro Sula, a city sometimes called the murder capital of the world, was mostly a show. Despite the government's promise of job leads, a $500 stipend, psychological counseling and schooling, returning mother Angelica Galvez said she wasn't expecting much.

"They haven't helped me before," said Galvez, 31, who was traveling with her 6-year-old daughter, Abigail. "Why should I believe them now?"

Immigration advocates have criticized the expedited removal of migrants, who are fleeing violence, widespread crime and corruption as counter to the humanitarian needs of those who are arriving at the U.S-Mexico border.