"The Daily Show" aired its long-awaited segment on the Washington, D.C., NFL team name, in which fans were confronted by Natives on the set.

Before it even aired, the segment proved controversial. The satirical cable television news program had recruited team fans for the segment via Twitter; four were ultimately chosen to participate. But those participants told the Washington Post they felt like they were attacked.

Kelli O'Dell, who says it was unfair for "The Daily Show" to have her debate Amanda Blackhorse--the lead plaintiff in Blackhorse v. Pro-Football, Inc., which resulted in cancelling six of the team's trademarks--says she felt like she was placed "in danger." O'Dell later called authorities to pull "The Daily Show" tapes she had consented to appear on:

Two days later, O'Dell said she called D.C. police and tried to submit a police report, but authorities told her no crime had been committed.

Over at Native Appropriations, Adrienne Keene outlined her rejection of the Washington Post's article. While Keene sympathized with O'Dell, she also highlighted the bias that may have informed O'dell's stance:

Ok, pause. I do feel bad for Kelli, that she was put in a position without her consent where she was forced to defend a position that she deeply feels is right, only to be told over and over again that it is wrong. Welcome to every time that Native people open their mouth about mascot issues. Though, (this is me being genuine now) confronting your own privilege is hard and scary, and it's not easy to have to do it on national TV.

But to say you "felt in danger?" of what? That one of the Native artists, comedians, journalists, educators, or lawyers sitting in front of you was going to physically attack you? Wow. Just, wow. No savage Indian stereotypes here...

"The Daily Show's" Jon Stewart addressed the fans' complaints--and added that his program would never intentionally misrepresent someone's comments.