The formerly known Desert Trails Elementary School in Adelanto, Calif. Photo: Julianne Hing/Colorlines.com
Fri, Jan 10, 2014 2:30 PM EST

On Monday Chrissy Guzman and Lori Yuan, two Adelanto, Calif., mothers, will be arraigned in Victorville Superior Court on charges that the two vandalized Desert Trails Elementary School just before it was converted to a charter school last June. It's the most recent development in the saga of the nation's first parent trigger takeover of a public school.

Guzman and Yuan could face up to three years in county jail for allegedly spraying ketchup, mustard and paint throughout the school and damaging rugs, window coverings and classrooms, San Bernardino County DA spokesperson Christopher Lee told the San Bernardino County Sun. The damage, done days before the school was handed over to a private charter school operator, came to $8,000. The school is now called the Desert Trails Preparatory Academy.

Guzman and Yuan were the most outspoken local critics of the town's use of the parent trigger, which allows parents whose kids go to a school with chronically low test scores to pull a one-time lever to overhaul their children's school by choosing from a menu of options, including replacing the principal, firing all the staff, and converting a school to a charter school. Ostensibly a tool of parent empowerment, critics have called the parent trigger a ruse which props up parents as the face of a very specific set of market-driven, test-focused education reforms. The parent trigger has since become an education reform and media darling, but the real-life story of it is complicated, and often ugly.

For more, read Colorlines' parent trigger coverage.